What Are The Five Properties That Control Rate Of Adoption?

In this episode we are going to consider the attributes or properties of a given innovation that contribute to its rate of adoption.
Rate of adoption is the rate at which an innovation spreads through a social system.
Rate of adoption is typically much faster when the “unit of adoption” is the individual rather than an organisation of some kind.
One means of speeding the rate of adoption is to try and change the size of the group involved in the decision.

Example: visited a school where the decision making group was basically “all the teachers”. This was a BIG school and ultimately no decision was ever made.

 

On the past few weeks of the Out of School podcast, the hosts are looking at the book Diffusions of Innovations. In episode 1 of the series, they looked at why and at what rate innovations spread. In episode 2, they looked at how users decide to adopt products.

In this episode 3, they consider the attributes or properties of a given innovation that contribute to its rate of adoption. Rate of adoption is the rate at which an innovation spreads through a social system. Rate of adoption is typically much faster when the “unit of adoption” is the individual rather than an organization of some kind.

One means of speeding the rate of adoption is to try and change the size of the group involved in the decision. Example: visited a school where the decision making group was basically “all the teachers”. This was a BIG school and ultimately no decision was ever made.

Defining properties of innovations allows us to approach a standard categorisation of innovations such that we can say one innovation is more or less like another. The properties of innovations are based on perception as much as they are based on fact.

The five properties are:

  1. Relative Advantage
  2. Compatibility with Beliefs
  3. Complexity (the only negative attribute where more of it slows adoption)
  4. Trialability
  5. Observability

 

Out of School is a syndicated podcast series about education and technology and is run by Bradley Chambers (@bradleychambers), Director of Information Technology for Brainerd Baptist School, and Fraser Speirs (@fraserspeirs), Head of Computing and IT at Cedars School of Excellence.

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